Tag Archives: WordPress

Facing Facebook: part two of the seven-month itch

Beaver

Photo by Michael Runtz

Did you get cold and hungry pulled over on Basin Road in Algonquin Park waiting for my return?   Sorry. I had some trouble along the way.  For one thing, my power supply got zapped.  Let’s roll back the wheels of our vehicle a bit.

We were stopped with my biologist brother, Michael, and his spouse, Ann, to investigate a downed poplar.  Let’s ease ourselves out of the car.  Careful, don’t slam the doors!

We hear the crunching and munching first. Then, almost within touching distance we spot one, two, three beavers vigorously shredding their hard harvest.  After a while, they swim away, branches in tow, their destination hidden by the dense growth.

True master builders, the beaver applies mud, stones and branches with an innate grasp of what’s needed and where.  I, on the other hand, an apprentice builder, was heading to what was decidedly unnatural,  to construct my client’s Facebook page.  With code. Continue reading

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Giving in to the seven-month itch: two blogs and one Facebook page later

Canadian beaver

photo by Michael Runtz

These past weeks, I have indeed been beavering away, working hard  on creating a blog,  Facebook page, newsletter and the first of a series of newspaper articles, all for a client,  in my new (communications consultant) body.  And you’ll see that my own blog has gone from black to white.   Literally.

Maybe it’s the seven-month itch,  building over months of learning, then billowing like Marilyn’s skirt in a whoosh of sustained activity.

Coraline called out,  piquing my interest with a scrubbed, clean  face attached to a well-muscled frame. Continue reading

Taking up ProBlogger’s 7-link challenge

7-link challengeFour days ago, ProBlogger Darren Rowse challenged fellow bloggers to publish a post based on the following seven themes.  Hooked by the idea, I rolled up my sleeves and got to it.  Then I read Darren’s own seven-link post.  If you don’t already know, Darren is a highly successful blogger, speaker consultant and founder of several blog networks and blogs, including ProBlogger, which features tips on blogging.  His Wikipedia entry notes that “as of 22 May 2009, Problogger was listed as number two on Technorati’s most favorited blogs list and number 40 on the most linked to blog.”

I reconsidered my participation in the challenge. It seemed audacious to hoist my hand — I’ve only been blogging for five months. However, the whole point of the exercise is to learn by doing.  So, here’s my contribution.

  1. My first post: Go slow, just don’t stop.  The date was March 6, 2010.  I shared how I was setting out on a brand new course in life, to learn to apply social media, out of my job and comfort zone, and how I planned to research and learn from the best, using the blog to distill and demonstrate my findings as I go.  I wrote:   Step four is harder—where to go online?  It’s a bit like entering a packed exhibition hall or a Saturday-morning market, full of noise, bright colours and lights, a sea of rows/directions. I didn’t mention how anxious I get in crowds!
  2. A post I enjoyed writing the most: The not-so-obvious: visiting the Shrute farm and learning to blog.  Writing this post was fun, inspired by a Consumerist news item tied to the TV program, the Office.  Newcomers to social media can feel like outsiders.  As I wrote in this post:   It’s just as easy to “not get” a key element or step when you’re learning to blog.   If you’re new to social media tools, the language that’s tossed around online, especially on discussion floors, can be confusing.  You’re there in your Walmart sneakers and they’re bouncing around in their spiffy Air Jordans. Continue reading

11 voices worth listening to

Northern House Wren

photo by Roger D'Anjou

It’s 5 a.m. and the staccato bursts are making it impossible to sleep: tch tch tch tch tch tch TCHI… tch tch tch tch tch tch TCHI.  The tiny but loud Northern House Wrens have a young family in the tall bluebird house near my office but their voices seem to penetrate no matter where I am in the house.   The Chippewa Indians called this bird O-du-na-mis-sug-ud-da-we-shi, meaning big noise for its size! No kidding.

Since I started this blog in early March, I’ve discovered other voices that have become invaluable in my journey to learn and apply social media.  These voices I want to keep close by, as the tools and techniques for the channels change at a frequency that makes my head spin.  Some I follow through RSS feeds, others through Twitter, Facebook or a combination of these channels.

Blogging voices

  • The first of these voices is @timethief.  Clear, current and correct, her onecoolsitebloggingtips is one of the best resources for WordPress-hosted blogs.  I frequently revisit her posts, like the recent three-part series on changing themes, as new needs arise.   My second blog is now in progress using Cutline and I’ve suggested a friend check out the Structure theme to improve the look and feel of her web site.
  • Both Darren Rowse at ProBlogger and Brian Clark at CopyBlogger can be counted on for great blogging tips. Continue reading

Any requests before we dine?

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Frogs are fun. Dancing, fluting, grinning—they lend merriment to our gardens. And today, one jumped right into my blog, requiring me to learn about adding galleries and slide shows.

It began late last night when I was doing some catch-up reading on onecoolsitebloggingtips.com. I came across something somewhere about the new Inuit Types theme.  That set me off to explore other related items, one being Noel’s  blog post with a gallery set up as a slideshow.   I loved it, but I couldn’t stay up any longer–it was already 2 a.m.

Stuck at my computer this morning, I struggled to write a business text. The words weren’t coming so I grabbed my camera and left. Two hours and 80 images later, I returned. I hadn’t gone far—just my own yard. But that yard includes no less than 30 gardens.

Clumps of bright tulips, swathes of hyacinths, cheery daffodils, and woodland wonders—mayapples, bellworts, bloodroot, bluebells, cohosh, foamflower, meadowrue, to name just a few. The unfurling of ferns, hostas, Solomon’s seal, emerging from their winter cocoons. The array of wonderfully patterned leaves,  the toothy elderberry to the baby-sized barrenwort,

A cool grey frog shouldering a large tuba caught my eye, commanding a closer look. This smooth operator was staring down a young pasque flower whose petals were standing on end. No wonder—Mr. Frog had a distinct yellow smudge at the corner of his froggy mouth. He was clearly telling the frightened flower, any last requests before we dine?

That’s how I saw it.

So the tuba-playing frog joined my photos of the day and inspired this blog and gallery. Amazingly, I managed to get the gallery and slide show running smoothly right from the get go.  I supplemented the wordpress.com instructions with information I found on gammagirl’s blogContinue reading

The not-so-obvious: visiting the Schrute farm and learning to blog

Schrute Farm

Schrute Farm

As reported on the Consumerist today, someone actually wanted to book a vacation at Schrute farms, the farm/inn mentioned on episodes of The Office.  Wasn’t me. I swear it.  Could have been, though!

The obvious isn’t always so.

Some of us are gullible natural believers. Or, sometimes, we miss a word, a sentence, a step.

The Stouffer’s Bistro Baja Grilled Chicken melt called out to me from my freezer today. Ripping it open, I went looking for the microwave temp and time. That’s when I saw the instructions for folding the box into a platform.  The food, you see, is to sit on the part with the special coating. Oh. Too late for my mangled piece of cardboard.

It’s just as easy to “not get” a key element or step when you’re learning to blog. If you’re new to social media tools, the language that’s tossed around online, especially on discussion floors, can be confusing. You’re there in your Walmart sneakers and they’re bouncing around in their spiffy Air Jordans.

Continue reading

timethief flips time and place for bloggers like me

Monarch butterfly

Photo by Karen Runtz

As a kid, I used to be afraid of caterpillars. That’s changed. I now do everything I can to attract and sustain butterflies. That includes naturalizing milkweed to feed monarch caterpillars.  Yesterday, WordPress blogger timethief also flipped time and place for me as I continue blogging, learning and applying social media.

It was a dull, grey day and I was hours into research, chasing links, weighted down by thousands of word about SEO, tips and tools, my energy and confidence draining. I slogged on, looking for wisdom. .

Somehow, I ended up back at WordPress. I think it was all the SEO talk that got me thinking about optimizing the usability of my blog. I dug into the dirt on fonts. And that’s when I found timethief.

Unearthing her blog, I came across a posting on free image hosting services where you can store, share and use to publish your blog photos. Most of the providers offer many more options as well. Good stuff.

I dug deeper, finding another link on optimizing your images –reducing their size so the page loads faster. As someone who was on dial-up less than a year ago, this shouted out–yes, yes, pick me!

Something drew me to Web Resizer at the bottom of the list. It was the only one I checked out. Their landing page was promising, crisp and clear like the way timethief presents her own tech tips.  Yes, you can add borders to your images here.  I clicked on the “Resize Photos Now”. Then I saw it:  Free Rice. PLAY and FEED a Hungry Person.  I don’t normally play games, but this was different. I set the image testing aside for the time being.

What followed was a fun little word challenge. Continue reading

Finding and using the right images

bergenias in bloom

photo by Karen Runtz

I love photography. And photographers too, it seems—I ended up marrying two.

So when I read about using photos on your blog, it clicked.

I wasted no time heading to Flickr, in search of images to retrofit my first two posts. First up had to be a squirrel. Then I found it—the perfect image, followed by the anxious wait to hear back from Bengt Holm, the photographer. YES! I can use it. Hey, he lives in Sweden. That is so cool.

The reading on my happiness thermometer began dropping soon after as I struggled with the mechanics of incorporating the photo following Flickr’s instructions. I spent a good part of the next two hours with a very patient soul in their help forum. In the end, I gave up trying to link back to their site and worked with the downloaded image instead. As I continued with the WordPress WYSIWYG interface, I began to see the downside of a tool that keeps you to their code. I managed to achieve the basics, anyway, and was thrilled to see the image live on my second post on learning and applying social media.

Continue reading

What’s in a name/title. Sometimes too much.

photo of surprised squirrel

Photo by Bengt Holm

The magic moment. My first blog was live. OMG. Look at the title. Why didn’t I see that before?

A flash to recent news about the Canadian history magazine “The Beaver”, finding that with the internet, its 90-year old title is no longer appropriate.

My first title, you see, was in fact “go slow, just don’t stop”. I blush to think what search engines would have made of that.

WordPress did say the blog title could be changed at any time. What to use instead. Chris Abrahams’ video (more on this later) says to make it pithy, interesting.

Ignore the squirrels! What else! They have come to symbolize my struggle, reminding me of what I can’t do, evading and mocking me, getting me down. A bit like the 14-year old who refused yet again to go to school today.

They will not get the better of me.  I will learn and apply social media.

So it was back to the edit mode. But let’s rewind this narrative to zero, which was my hands-on knowledge of creating a blog one short week ago.

WordPress rocks

What platform to use to edit, publish and host my blog. It had to be free, easy to use, and deliver an end product that would look at least somewhat professional.  I scanned my bookmarked sites to see what others were using. Continue reading